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Author: Subject: What is your perception of beautiful hair?
crabrice
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[*] posted on 1.5.2012 at 08:28 AM
What is your perception of beautiful hair?


Pleasant African youngsters talking about hair, relaxer, etc. light-hearted! I love this! Real Nicely done!:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dF0FIJ2LSMg&feature=related




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browngrl86
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[*] posted on 1.5.2012 at 10:07 AM


My perception of beautiful hair?? HEALTHY HAIR!



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[*] posted on 1.5.2012 at 12:13 PM


Quote:


Interviewer: "Would you consider growing out your natural hair?"

African woman: "I've considered doing it, but I'm not brave enough....."



Code for nappy hair is ugly; white folks' hair is beautiful.

Sick biotches. :coffee:

ADDENDUM:

I take that back. The black self-hate exhibited in this video, except for (bless her!) the one girl, is indicative of these sick puppies'.... these sick, lying puppies'.... assimilation into western (white) ideals of beauty. Or as we like to say, they've bought into the White Standard of Beauty which deems black hair to be ugly. They and the bruthas who love them. I know it, and the obviously white interviewer knows it otherwise why would she ask each girl if her chemically straightened hair was a result of "western" influences? In other words, the white woman looked at their hair and saw an imitation of her own. Oh, and if it were "not" an imitation, why didn't African women from the dawn of civilization, create chemicals to straighten our hair? Why was it a black woman, Madam CJ Walker, who invented the straightening comb.... after being born the daughter of a slave in America? Invented it only AFTER being told her hair was ugly, not pretty like Miss Ann's?

**sigh** There's a book written by an African (forget which country)with a catchy title. It's called "The Beautiful Ones are not yet Born." 50 years after he wrote it, "Ugly" black girls are still being born and around..... lying like dogs on why the hair God put on their heads are NOT their "crowning glory."

Btw, I've worn my hair in every incarnation - natural, hot combed, chemically straightened. At NO point would I even consider LYING about why I did to my hair what I did. I am not ashamed of my hair. Au contraire, I treaure MY 'crowning glory' in ALL its versatility.


P.S.
To answer the question - beautiful hair IMHO is hair that looks like mine, is THICK like mine and versatile, like mine.




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CADreamin
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[*] posted on 1.6.2012 at 12:57 AM
Beautiful hair?


As Browngrl86 stated healthy hair! :)


From Black Like Moi (thought some may have interest)

The History of Black Hair
by HairCrush

Whether it’s activist Angela Davis’s Afro or hip-hop diva Lil’ Kim’s “weave of the week,” black hair has long had the power to set trends and reflect societal attitudes.

Since February is Black History Month — a time to remember important people and events that shaped the lives of African Americans—we thought it was an ideal time to explore how hairstyles have been interwoven into that history. It is a story that continues to evolve. Here is a look back at some of the key events and people who shaped the black hair story.

1444: Europeans trade on the west coast of Africa with people wearing elaborate hairstyles, including locks, plaits and twists.

1619: First slaves brought to Jamestown; African language, culture and grooming tradition begin to disappear.

1700s: Calling black hair “wool,” many whites dehumanize slaves. The more elaborate African hairstyles cannot be retained.

1800s: Without the combs and herbal treatments used in Africa, slaves rely on bacon grease, butter and kerosene as hair conditioners and cleaners. Lighter-skinned, straight-haired slaves command higher prices at auction than darker, more kinky-haired ones. Internalizing color consciousness, blacks promote the idea that blacks with dark skin and kinky hair are less attractive and worth less.

1865: Slavery ends, but whites look upon black women who style their hair like white women as well-adjusted. “Good” hair becomes a prerequisite for entering certain schools, churches, social groups and business networks.
Madame C.J. Walker

1880: Metal hot combs, invented in 1845 by the French, are readily available in the United States. The comb is heated and used to press and temporarily straighten kinky hair.

1900s: Madame C.J. Walker develops a range of hair-care products for black hair. She popularizes the press-and-curl style. Some criticize her for encouraging black women to look white.
1910: Walker is featured in the Guinness Book of Records as the first American female self-made millionaire.

1920s: Marcus Garvey, a black nationalist, urges followers to embrace their natural hair and reclaim an African aesthetic.

1954: George E. Johnson launches the Johnson Products Empire with Ultra Wave Hair Culture, a “permanent” hair straightener for men that can be applied at home. A women’s chemical straightener follows.


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[*] posted on 1.6.2012 at 01:22 PM


Quote:


Lighter-skinned, straight-haired slaves command higher prices at auction than darker, more kinky-haired ones. Internalizing color consciousness, blacks promote the idea that blacks with dark skin and kinky hair are less attractive and worth less.



I have a prob with this one. We all know (God, I hope we do!) the reason mulattoes commanded a higher price was for sexual reasons. After all, it was the darker-skinned Africans who worked in the field; slavers generally felt that the lighter the skin, the LESS fit for field work that person was. Thus, sexual purposes were the reason for the higher price. That said, I find it hard to believe that darker-skinned women were unhappy that rape, gang rape, and all manner of sexual degration was not in their futures. So I take issue with the notion commanding higher prices on the chopping block is why dark skin and kinky hair were "internalized" BY BLACK PEOPLE as a bad thing.

Btw, (since this is the 2nd time it's come up) does anyone think UNhealthy hair is "good" hair? :headscratch:




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[*] posted on 1.6.2012 at 09:59 PM


Beautiful thick clean hair with a healthy sheen. Colored hair is cool, though I'm not too keen on platinum blonde hair, but that's just my personal preference. Green, purple, violet hair, sure. Blonde for some reason makes me instantly recoil, unless it's real short like Eve's.
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crabrice
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[*] posted on 1.7.2012 at 09:53 AM


Me too. Blonde aint for everyone! It suits certain people.
I loveth Eve's hair, the style, too!




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[*] posted on 1.9.2012 at 04:44 PM


Hair that is soft to to the touch,has a nice sheen and looks good on the person.I've had lovers that had anything from straight blond hair to beautiful naturals.All of it was good..The only problem I may have is black women with shades of green,bright red,yellow, and orange in their hair....Its too distracting.
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[*] posted on 1.10.2012 at 12:06 PM


Clean,healthy and combed!



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[*] posted on 1.11.2012 at 01:57 PM


Singer Brandy Happy That Her Future Child May Have Good Hair

by HairCrush

The singer Brandy recently appeared on The Wendy Williams Show where she spoke about her new gig on the sitcom, The Game, as well as her beef with Kim Kardashian. Brandy also stated that she had a new man in her life and she was in fact "in love". Wendy then made the statement, "If you have a baby with him, the baby will have good hair!" and Brandy agreed ecstatically, "Yes! Wendy Yes!". I was a bit saddened to see that people still use this kind of language. If they believe "good hair" (which is usually described as fine, silky waves or curls) is so fantastic then they are also saying that the opposite (nappy, kinky coils) is bad hair. What kind of message is this sending to little girls including Brandy's daughter, Syrai, who do not have "good hair"? It is teaching youth at a very early age that what they have is not desirable or good enough. We need to be more careful with the terms that we use and be aware of how it may affect our children. Good hair is healthy hair; it should have nothing to do with it's "grade".

Check out Brandy's interview below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=LKckBxYwmdw#!

http://blacklikemoi.com/2012/01/news/singer-brandy-happy-future-child-good-ha...
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[*] posted on 1.11.2012 at 02:49 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by CADreamin

Singer Brandy Happy That Her Future Child May Have Good Hair

by HairCrush

The singer Brandy recently appeared on The Wendy Williams Show where she spoke about her new gig on the sitcom, The Game, as well as her beef with Kim Kardashian. Brandy also stated that she had a new man in her life and she was in fact "in love". Wendy then made the statement, "If you have a baby with him, the baby will have good hair!" and Brandy agreed ecstatically, "Yes! Wendy Yes!". I was a bit saddened to see that people still use this kind of language. If they believe "good hair" (which is usually described as fine, silky waves or curls) is so fantastic then they are also saying that the opposite (nappy, kinky coils) is bad hair. What kind of message is this sending to little girls including Brandy's daughter, Syrai, who do not have "good hair"? It is teaching youth at a very early age that what they have is not desirable or good enough. We need to be more careful with the terms that we use and be aware of how it may affect our children. Good hair is healthy hair; it should have nothing to do with it's "grade".



:thanx:

One thing I'd like to point out, though. There is no such thing as "healthy" hair! The hair on our heads is DEAD. Nothing dead is "healthy." Health presumes "life" that can ebb and flow, bloom and wilt, get sick, get well. Dead (like our hair) is just dead.

Hair is made of the same fiber as the nails on our fingers and toes. Just as our finger/toenails are DEAD, so is the hair we see on our heads. Clip your finger/toe nails, shave your head - you feel no pain. Why? Because only LIVE tissue have nerve endings; nails and hair are dead. We can whip that keratin (the fiber hair is made of); brush, oil, lubricate that keratin until it shines.... but it can never be healthy because, well, it's dead. :dunno:

Quote:


Check out Brandy's interview below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=LKckBxYwmdw#!

http://blacklikemoi.com/2012/01/news/singer-brandy-happy-future-child-good-ha...



LOL! Started not to "get pissed" looking at the links, but went ahead. LOVE this comment:

Quote:

This tells me that both Wendy and Brandy are very small minded people. She is concerned about the grade of her child’s hair? What would she do if the child has hard nappy and kinky hair put the child up for adoption? And what is Wendy talking about? Everything on her (or him) is fake.


:lol:

One last thing.....

Quote:


"good hair" (which is usually described as fine, silky waves or curls



Re-read Youngheart's post (at least the 'clean and combed' part ;) ). Don't comb those waves and/or curls (fine, silky :wtf: buying into the stereotype, much?).... don't comb them and see if they're "fine," "silky," rather than hard, coarse, knotted to the point where you can't get a comb through it!

Again, CaDreamin, :thanx:




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[*] posted on 1.15.2012 at 08:34 PM


I am proud of my natural hair. I refuse chemicals and do not identify good hair as "closer to non-African texture".

It took many years of colonialism to create damaging mind sets - such those with Brandy's "good hair" responce.
It will take many more years before more feel confident and find goodness, beauty and strength in all of our various kinks/curls




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Socrates
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[*] posted on 1.17.2012 at 08:52 AM


Hair that looks like it actually belongs to the person wearing it.



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[*] posted on 1.17.2012 at 02:30 PM


Regardless of length...but hair that grows from one's own scalp underneath whatever...but is washed, dried, protein mositurized and looks "healthy"....hair that sees the light of day during the course of a lifetime..and not hidden all the time underneath something...

Hair that one takes time and care to keep clean, and not patched up, dry scalped..looking dead or matted...on the head..

Any textured hair....can be poorly cared for and not "look" or feel healthy...




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[*] posted on 1.17.2012 at 03:03 PM


that's easy: healthy hair, little to no breakage. healthy scalp. it is a daily deal for black women.
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