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Author: Subject: Altered Reality........
NikkiSixx
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[*] posted on 12.11.2008 at 11:24 PM
Altered Reality........




:rofl::rofl: Know thyself.:rofl: Really.......it could only have happened like this. Without those two variables, it would have missed me yet again.:rofl: Goodness. But today, it finally came together, and stuck like pancakes and glue. I always let that one go, just because of the obvious.

If I wasn't out shopping, in my own little world that was given to me, that I've always accepted without question or need, having experienced no problems from within, always welcomed by those in this particular zone.......it would've flew right over my head.

Even though I've already heard from those who couldn't make the cut, or weren't allowed in....did it really sink in until just a couple of hours ago? I'm :stupid: :lmao:

I had to call everybody, after having a good laugh over this strangely repressed self discovery that was finally named without hesitation. Of course, they acted like they already knew, but if it was all like that why wasn't it appropriately put there, so I knew it too, dammit? :rofl:

I suppose because it is a little strange to even go there in the first place.

But, it is what it is.

And yes, I even surmised that I was using this to keep my world exactly how it is. Everybody was split into groups, with each group each having the same overwhelming characteristics.

It really isn't my fault.............to a certain extent. I am a product of my environment...born and bred. :shades:

And even though it will always be us vs. them, at the very least I won't be so quick to paint everybody *outside* with the same brushstroke, anymore.

Yep....même je dois admettre que je commençais à noter quelques occurrences plutôt étranges dans mon comportement à l'extérieur de personnes qui a à peine mérité mes ajustements sociaux.

It's the reason younger sister #1 and I don't get along, despite growing up in the same house for years. She went thataway:sneaky: and I toed the line.:hmph:

It's not even surprising that she acts just like them, too. :rofl: My Goodness.

This is just too much for me to fully process right now, even though I am ecstatic over this newfound epiphany.

A vacation is just what I need right about now. Drinking in anticipation............:yes:

Culture shock. :wow: :rofl::rofl:

________________________________________________
I hit it......and now I'm through.




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[*] posted on 12.12.2008 at 07:23 PM


http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/6453/i541969593303yo0.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zeR3NSYcHk

TOPICS OF THE DAY:

:ummm:.................................................................................................................................................... ....(searching)..............................................................................................................................Ok....

1. It's funny how people always want other people to change, instead of looking at themselves first. I suppose change is always deemed necessary when it's somebody else who is being dragged up to bat.

2. (Tell me the similarities aren't hilarious...:rofl:) Well.....there are always reasons that aren't good enough, so they turn into excuses, only to make something or someone a good scapegoat.

Is that all? Yeah.

Anyway.....I'm really starting to dig it here. I see why MySpace and whatnot is so popular. I like the freedom and control, even though it's fairly limited. And who knows....I might even pipm my page over there, when I get the full hang of it.

I like a challenge. So 2 months sounds pretty reasonable.....and who knows? It might get extended if I completely fall in love with whole thing.:rofl:




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[*] posted on 12.13.2008 at 03:32 PM


Obama's true colors: Black, white ... or neither?

JESSE WASHINGTON, AP National Writer

A perplexing new chapter is unfolding in Barack Obama's racial saga: Many people insist that "the first black president" is actually not black.

Debate over whether to call this son of a white Kansan and a black Kenyan biracial, African-American, mixed-race, half-and-half, multiracial — or, in Obama's own words, a "mutt" — has reached a crescendo since Obama's election shattered assumptions about race.

So, at the very least, Choc was keeping it real with honest views from the outside with her post.:tu:

Obama has said, "I identify as African-American — that's how I'm treated and that's how I'm viewed. I'm proud of it." In other words, the world gave Obama no choice but to be black, and he was happy to oblige.

But the world has changed since the young Obama found his place in it.I find that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Intermarriage and the decline of racism are dissolving ancient definitions. The candidate Obama, in achieving what many thought impossible, was treated differently from previous black generations. And many white and mixed-race people now view President-elect Obama as something other than black.Not big surprise there.

So what now for racial categories born of a time when those from far-off lands were property rather than people, or enemy instead of family?

"They're falling apart," said Marty Favor, a Dartmouth professor of African and African-American studies and author of the book "Authentic Blackness."

"In 1903, W.E.B. DuBois said the question of the 20th century is the question of the color line, which is a simplistic black-white thing," said Favor, who is biracial. "This is the moment in the 21st century when we're stepping across that."

Rebecca Walker, a 38-year-old writer with light brown skin who is of Russian, African, Irish, Scottish and Native American descent, said she used to identify herself as "human," which upset people of all backgrounds. So she went back to multiracial or biracial, "but only because there has yet to be a way of breaking through the need to racially identify and be identified by the culture at large."Minority within the minority.

"Of course Obama is black. And he's not black, too," Walker said. "He's white, and he's not white, too.:thanx: Obama is whatever people project onto himAs we all are. ... he's a lot of things, and neither of them necessarily exclude the other."

But U.S. Rep. G. K. Butterfield,http://img223.imageshack.us/img223/8638/gkblu2.jpg a black man who by all appearances is white, feels differently.

Butterfield, 61, grew up in a prominent black family in Wilson, N.C. Both of his parents had white forebears, "and those genes came together to produce me." He grew up on the black side of town, led civil rights marches as a young man, and to this day goes out of his way to inform people that he is certainly not white.

Butterfield has made his choice; he says let Obama do the same.

"Obama has chosen the heritage he feels comfortable with," he said. "His physical appearance is black. I don't know how he could have chosen to be any other race. Let's just say he decided to be white — people would have laughed at him."True.

"You are a product of your experience.:thanx: I'm a U.S. congressman, and I feel some degree of discomfort when I'm in an all-white group. We don't have the same view of the world, our experiences have been different.":thanx::thanx:

The entire issue balances precariously on the "one-drop" rule, which sprang from the slaveowner habit of dropping by the slave quarters and producing brown babies. One drop of black blood meant that person, and his or her descendants, could never be a full citizen.

Today, the spectrum of skin tones among African-Americans — even those with two black parents — is evidence of widespread white ancestry. Also, since blacks were often light enough to pass for white, unknown numbers of white Americans today have blacks hidden in their family trees.

One book, "Black People and their Place in World History," by Dr. Leroy Vaughn, even claims that five past presidents — Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge — had black ancestors, which would make Obama the sixth of his kind.

Mix in a few centuries' worth of Central, South and Native Americans, plus Asians, and untold millions of today's U.S. citizens need a DNA test to decipher their true colors. The melting pot is working.

Yet the world has never been confronted with such powerful evidence as Obama. So as soon as he was elected, the seeds of confusion began putting down roots.

"Let's not forget that he is not only the first African-American president, but the first biracial candidate. He was raised by a single white mother," a Fox News commentator said seven minutes after Obama was declared the winner.

"We do not have our first black president," the author Christopher Hitchens said on the BBC program "Newsnight." "He is not black. He is as black as he is white."

A Doonesbury comic strip that ran the day after the election showed several soldiers celebrating.

"He's half-white, you know," says a white soldier.

"You must be so proud," responds another.

Pride is the center of racial identity, and some white people seem insulted by a perception that Obama is rejecting his white mother (even though her family was a centerpiece of his campaign image-making) or baffled by the notion that someone would choose to be black instead of half-white. Alicia Keys went through the same thing. Especially when she used the "n*gga" in her song. Mariah, too. That's what it means to be mainstream.

"He can't be African-American. With race, white claims 50 percent of him and black 50 percent of him. Half a loaf is better than no loaf at all," Ron Wilson of Plantation, Fla., wrote in a letter to the Sun-Sentinel newspaper.

Attempts to whiten Obama leave a bitter taste for many African-Americans, who feel that at their moment of triumph, the rules are being changed to steal what once was deemed worthless — blackness itself. Where are these people at? I need to write some letters.

"For some people it's honestly confusion," said Favor, the Dartmouth professor. "For others it's a ploy to sort of reclaim the presidency for whiteness, as though Obama's blackness is somehow mitigated by being biracial."

Then there are the questions remaining from Obama's entry into national politics, when some blacks were leery of this Hawaiian-born newcomer who did not share their history.

Linda Bob, a black schoolteacher from Eustis, Fla., said that calling Obama black when he was raised in a white family and none of his ancestors experienced slavery could cause some to ignore or forget the history of racial injustice.

"It just seems unfair to totally label him African-American without acknowledging that he was born to a white mother," she said. "It makes you feel like he doesn't have a class, a group." Only because you wish to place him outside of yours.

There is at least one group eagerly waiting for Obama to embrace them. "To me, as to increasing numbers of mixed-race people, Barack Obama is not our first black president. He is our first biracial, bicultural president ... a bridge between races, a living symbol of tolerance, a signal that strict racial categories must go," Marie Arana wrote in the Washington Post.

He's a bridge between eras as well. The multiracial category "wasn't there when I was growing up," said John McWhorter, a 43-year-old fellow at the Manhattan Institute's Center for Race and Ethnicity, who is black. "In the '70s and the '80s, if somebody had one white parent and one black parent, the idea was they were black and had better get used to it and develop this black identity. That's now changing."

Latinos, whom the census identifies as an ethnic group and not a race, were not counted separately by the government until the 1970s. After the 1990 census, many people complained that the four racial categories — white, black, Asian, and American Indian/Alaska native — did not fit them. The government then allowed people to check more than one box. (It also added a fifth category, for Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders.)

Six million people, or 2 percent of the population, now say they belong to more than one race, according to the most recent census figures. Another 19 million people, or 6 percent of the population, identify themselves as "some other race" than the five available choices.

The White House Office of Management and Budget, which oversees the census, specifically decided not to add a "multiracial" category, deeming it not a race in and of itself.

"We are in a transitional period" regarding these labels, McWhorter said. "I think that in only 20 years, the notion that there are white people and there are black people and anyone in between has some explaining to do and an identity to come up with, that will all seem very old-fashioned." It's old fashioned now. The probing of another person's racial background will never go away. And since the melting pot is working overtime, it will only further the need to place people in boxes, if for no other purpose than to identify and connect through some of life's shared experiences. And that is a very powerful thing.

The debate over Obama's identity is just the latest step in a journey he unflinchingly chronicled in his memoir, "Dreams from My Father."

As a teenager, grappling with the social separation of his white classmates, "I had no idea who my own self was," Obama wrote.

In college in the 1970s, like millions of other dark-skinned Americans searching for self respect in a discriminatory nation, Obama found refuge in blackness. Classmates who sidestepped the label "black" in favor of "multiracial" chafed at Obama's newfound pride: "They avoided black people," he wrote. "It wasn't a matter of conscious choice, necessarily, just a matter of gravitational pull, the way integration always worked, a one-way street. The minority assimilated into the dominant culture, not the other way around." Yes. Ok.

Fast-forward 30 years, to the early stages of Obama's presidential campaign. Minorities are on track to outnumber whites, to redefine the dominant American culture. And the black political establishment, firmly rooted in the civil rights movement, questioned whether the outsider Obama was "black enough."

Then came the primary and general elections, when white voters were essential for victory. "Now I'm too black," Obama joked in July before an audience of minority journalists. "There is this sense of going back and forth depending on the time of day in terms of making assessments about my candidacy."

Today, it seems no single definition does justice to Obama — or to a nation where the revelation that Obama's eighth cousin is Dick Cheney, the white vice president from Wyoming, caused barely a ripple in the campaign.

In his memoir, Obama says he was deeply affected by reading that Malcolm X, the black nationalist-turned-humanist, once wished his white blood could be expunged.

"Traveling down the road to self-respect my own white blood would never recede into mere abstraction," Obama wrote. "I was left to wonder what else I would be severing if I left my mother and my grandparents at some uncharted border."

http://img519.imageshack.us/img519/4719/i7855002113233ye1.gif




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[*] posted on 12.13.2008 at 04:06 PM


http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/9389/dollsmyspace18bh8.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2c0w7iOZYVI

Ok...well...I was going to find some way around that.....I suppose.

Anyway....some things go right over my head. But, it turns out that I was right in more ways than one.

Why people would even think *my mood* is in any way a reference to them and this board is beyond me. :lmao: I had to take that one all the way back. So when I had *blown* it was no wonder why people were jumping out the dark and poppin' off. :lmao:

Oooooookaaaaaaaaay. No. It never was and never will. I am not so totally consumed, fascinated, stumped, perplexed and in love with ya'll to have a constant reminder of how you're supposed to be making me feel.:freak: That's so mentally insane, it should be criminal. :wtf:

ANYWAY:shock:

Topics of the day:

1. Good luck with that.




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[*] posted on 12.15.2008 at 03:24 PM


http://img399.imageshack.us/img399/768/1315973yyfayl50w1bw4.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsTkv6HCiQU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1sLrRlCobY

See? There are always people who will take you farther than you planned on going...

Ex-`Sopranos' actor takes stand at murder trial

NEW YORK - Lillo Brancato says he didn't know an alleged accomplice was armed when he went looking for drugs.

Brancato, who played a wannabe mobster on the HBO hit "The Sopranos," says he was suffering from heroin withdrawal when he and Steven Armento went to an apartment where the actor had obtained drugs before.

The 32-year-old Brancato is charged with second-degree murder in the 2005 shooting death of Officer Daniel Enchautegui (En-chow-TAY'-gee).

Authorities say Armento and Brancato broke into the basement apartment to steal prescription drugs after a night of drinking at a strip club. Enchautegui, who lived next door, came out to investigate.

Brancato began his testimony Monday by describing his history of drug addiction that began while working on the 1993 film "A Bronx Tale."




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[*] posted on 12.15.2008 at 04:01 PM


See Kenyon Martin's new Tattoo for girlfriend rapper, Trina

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aqotfn78RIo

http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/6863/kenes7.gif


Most people have been asking for some time what are those lips on Nuggets forward Kenyon Martins neck? Well it's a tattoo he got for his girlfriend and hip hop artist Trina.

"It's just something that I wanted to get a while ago, but I'm not just gonna get it for anyone," Martin said at a dinner to officially launch his foundation.

Some fans have labeled it a horrendous tattoo, but it is somewhat creative and different.

See for yourself ...


http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/Video-K-Mart-talks-about-...




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[*] posted on 12.15.2008 at 09:30 PM


http://img201.imageshack.us/img201/8953/avibi6.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6zdhHLvT7k

Ok....I definitely need to make my salsa before I leave, so I can give away when I come back.

I have a headache, and my mouth's swollen. He hit me too hard this time. :birthday:

I was a littled disappointed watchinh House of Saddam. It was dry. It really didn't make feel one way or another about him. Except the obvious: we had no business over there, and seeing that Saddam was the lesser of two evils, ultimately, he should not have been executed. Anyway....perhaps this was something the British should've totally left up to us to tell....lies and all.

TOPICS OF THE DAY

Serial Killers:

Ok....I was officially terrified reading that.:rofl: Talk about getting intimate with someone. :wow:

At home with Carmelo and Lala:

Just finished reading the new Sister 2 Sister....Jamie asked when they were getting married, LaLa said ask CArmelo, to which he just shrugged.

A beautiful home and baby, yes. But what's with the personal relationship? No Essence shouldn't glorify them, because at the end of the day it's all smoke and mirrors.

LaLa has to put up with a lot to live there. It's the price of admission.




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[*] posted on 12.16.2008 at 09:46 AM


Tyler Perry at it again :tu:

http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1810027469/trailer

Movie: Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail

Release date: February 20, 2009

MPAA Rating: PG-13 mature thematic material, drug content, some violence and sexual situations

Starring: Tyler Perry, Keshia Knight Pulliam, Derek Luke, Tamela J. Mann and Vanessa Ferlito.

Directed By: Tyler Perry.




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[*] posted on 12.17.2008 at 07:34 PM


http://img291.imageshack.us/img291/2123/ist2181757emergencyexitoc1.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxeNZOLNh4c

Ga. judge jails Muslim woman over head scarf

ATLANTA – A Muslim woman arrested for refusing to take off her head scarf at a courthouse security checkpoint said Wednesday that she felt her human and civil rights were violated. A judge ordered Lisa Valentine, 40, to serve 10 days in jail for contempt of court, said police in Douglasville, a city of about 20,000 people on Atlanta's west suburban outskirts.

Valentine violated a court policy that prohibits people from wearing any headgear in court, police said after they arrested her Tuesday.

Kelley Jackson, a spokeswoman for Georgia Attorney General Thurbert Baker, said state law doesn't permit or prohibit head scarfs.

"It's at the discretion of the judge and the sheriffs and is up to the security officers in the court house to enforce their decision," she said.

Valentine, who recently moved to Georgia from New Haven, Conn., said the incident reminded her of stories she'd heard of the civil rights-era South.

"I just felt stripped of my civil, my human rights," she said Wednesday from her home. She said she was unexpectedly released after the Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations urged federal authorities to investigate the incident as well as others in Georgia.

The group cited a report that the same judge removed a woman and her 14-year-old daughter from the courtroom last week because they were wearing Muslim head scarves.

Jail officials declined to say why she was freed and municipal Court Judge Keith Rollins said that "it would not be appropriate" for him to comment on the case.

Last year, a judge in Valdosta in southern Georgia barred a Muslim woman from entering a courtroom because she would not remove her head scarf. There have been similar cases in other states, including Michigan, where a Muslim woman in Detroit filed a federal lawsuit in February 2007 after a judge dismissed her small-claims court case when she refused to remove a head and face veil.

Valentine's husband, Omar Hall, said his wife was accompanying her nephew to a traffic citation hearing when officials stopped her at the metal detector and told her she would not be allowed in the courtroom with the head scarf, known as a hijab.

Hall said Valentine, an insurance underwriter, told the bailiff that she had been in courtrooms before with the scarf on and that removing it would be a religious violation. When she turned to leave and uttered an expletive, Hall said a bailiff handcuffed her and took her before the judge.

_______________________________________________

I am a little baffled over the media's desire to label this situation a denial of religious right. This woman being arrested, and held in comtempt of court had nothing to do with her desire to wear her hijab into the courthouse..............the minute she proceeded to act like a foul-mouthed hooligan.

You cannot disrespect an officer of the court. And to think she expresses a desire to bring a lawsuit over this matter is literally mindblowing.

If she did it in private, and he chose to let it slide, Ok. But to do so in a public area, that officer has to keep order. If he would've let her get away with her open disrespect and disregard for the symbolic decency and deference of public law and order a court and its officers are required to uphold, what does this mean for the next person?

It becomes chaos from then on. And you cannot allow that to happen. She deserved everything she got.

People come into court thinking "Oh, just another day, I'll wear flip flops, cut off jeans, shorts, tank tops...whatever." And they get dismissed. There are signs stating what is not appropriate court attire. So why aren't these people making the news?

The problem I have with Muslims of American character, is that too often they are missing the basic fundamentals of true Islamic culture. And I'm not the only who feels as such.

Would this woman have been so quick to make foul utterances if she lived in Iran or Saudia Arabia? No. But you want to hide behind and under the plate of good old fashioned American civil rights when it suits you best?

Give me a break. :td:




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[*] posted on 12.18.2008 at 11:38 AM


http://img253.imageshack.us/img253/6626/mz109nw5.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsQvXgCcng8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrNoDUblAtE

I can only speak on this if it were a situation I was dealing with.

Fiance. Let's say we got engaged 8 months into the relationship. That leaves four months with my head in the clouds, fantasizing about a dream life. Then one day reality hits and I'm forced to see this man for who he is....flaws and all.

If it happened 4-5 years ago, I really couldn't be mad. This child was made and birthed way before I came on the scene. Now, I have a habit of looking for and at signs all around me. If my man was a little wobbly with his living and financial situation this was going to put a crimp in my lifestyle, and make him more dependent on my pocket, if it turned out to be his...:wave: Sorry dude....

One thing that I had always laid in my mind was that I'm not going to struggle. And, fortunately, I went against that in the past with a man I should've let go when he began making my life hell.

I don't know what it is with some men wanting these ride or die chicks.....but I learned I wasn't her. I'm not built like that.

So, maybe this is a sign that really and truly this man isn't for you. only you can really know and say for sure. Afterall, it did take a past action, and possible misstep on his part, for you to up and end everything.

And there's myriad reasons why this woman did what she did. But, first and foremost, is that he has a child he A) needs to know about (or have legally acknowledged, if he really knew and ran), and B) taken care. At the end of the day, those two factors should really only matter. Everything in the best interest of the child first.

I would go back to the drawing board, especially if there were other children on both sides to consider.




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[*] posted on 12.18.2008 at 11:52 AM


http://img147.imageshack.us/img147/6326/willsmithrp6.jpg[/URL]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zp2pJdIlxPI

Topics of the Day:

If you were rich

1. With the exception of family, people I already know and love, and my best friend of 15 years, anybody new that I came across, like partying with, or inviting into my life will have the same socioeconomic background.

I'm taking lessons some athletes refuse to learn. Sorry.

You live in a homeless shelter

I am so proud of this woman. And I love her spirit and conscience. I would stand on a chair and applaud her if I could. But....Satan would've tempted my azz that day.




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[*] posted on 12.19.2008 at 01:32 PM
Bristol Palin's future in-law arrested


http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/3750/43927785ur2.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3lDJKjLQNg


Sherry L. Johnston, the mother of Bristol Palin’s fiancé, was arrested Thursday night on drug charges.

Johnston was arrested at her Wasilla home and charged with six felony drug counts. Alaska state troopers then searched the Johnston home for further evidence of narcotics. She was charged with second-degree misconduct for allegedly manufacturing narcotics and a fourth-degree misconduct related to possession.

She has been released from the Mat-Su Pretrial Facility on a $2,000 bond.

Johnston is the mother of Levi Johnston, who was vaulted into the national spotlight in September when it was announced that he is the father of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s teenage daughter Bristol’s child. The baby is due on Saturday, and the two are set to wed this summer. We shall see.

Via a spokesman, the Alaska governor issued this statement to the Anchorage Daily News: “This is not a state government matter. Therefore the governor's communications staff will not be providing comment or scheduling interview opportunities.”


_____________________________________________________

There really isn't telling just how much the idiot b*tch is hiding. She said Obama runs with terrorists, and her soon-to-be in-laws are manufacturing drugs.

Say it ain't so!!!!!!:rofl:




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[*] posted on 12.19.2008 at 01:59 PM


http://img79.imageshack.us/img79/7638/starqt0.jpghttp://img504.imageshack.us/img504/1038/47careyys5.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjT6uVJbSdg

He's not dumping you because ...

Writing about dating is my full-time job, so, naturally, I hear a lot of pretty deranged tales of love gone wrong. But last week I received a letter from a woman who was convinced that men wouldn't go out with her because she was just too ... beautiful.

She fully believed her breathtaking attractiveness was anything but a man-magnet -- as one might expect. Instead, she said, her beauty acted as a Romeo-repellant, causing suitors to run screaming from her. Obviously, I explained the situation to her (perhaps it wasn't her gorgeous outsides, but her narcissistic insides that were doing the damage), but it did get me to thinking about all the other ridiculous reasons that women -- myself included -- come up with when they get dumped.

Along with being too beautiful, here are a few other qualities I guarantee nobody will ever break your heart over:

Too smart: I once had a friend who was convinced she couldn't keep a boyfriend because she was too smart for the male population. She was positive her staggering intellect was turning them off. Uh, no. What drove the men away (and most of her female friends, as well) was the fact that she was mean. We're talking stupendously cruel. Her definition of smart translated into cutting people down until they felt like the smallest person on earth. Not exactly a turn-on, no matter how cleverly it's worded.

Too nice: Generally, I hear this one more from men, but women are guilty of it, too. Here, the problem is semantics. "Nice" is a desirable quality. Whereas "doormat," "pantywaist," and "milquetoast" are not. Far too many people mistake the latter for the former, and there's a world of difference when it comes to dating. So, no, you're not getting dumped because you're too nice; you're getting the heave-ho because you're spineless.

Too good in bed: You've practiced Tantra, and you've never met a sexual position you wouldn't try at least once. Yet men will get with you one time, and then you never hear from them again. You're not getting dumped because of how well you do it, but because of how hard you try when you do it. Sex should be fun and relaxing -- not an audition for the porn Olympics.

Too intimidating: An amalgam of the "too smart"/"too beautiful" non-dilemma, these women think they keep getting blown off because they're too accomplished, too employed, too gorgeous, too intellectual, too too. The only kind of man who is put off by a kind, smart, beautiful woman with a great career and a fantastic smile is the kind of dolt you don't want to be bothered with dating in the first place. However, these jerks are few and far between. Don't blame your broken heart on his inability to handle your extreme fabulosity. The fact of the matter is that nobody but a psycho is going to dump you be because you're too perfect.

All this is not to say that his reasoning will make any sense if you do drag it out of him. It is to say that we ladies tend to overanalyze breakups. And while a little introspection is a good thing, a lot of introspection gets really boring, really fast.

Onward!




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[*] posted on 12.19.2008 at 02:21 PM


So what was the whole point???:shock:

It just really pisses me off when I read stories like this!!! Here, you have two selfish idiots who decided to challenge their daughter's adoption, uproot her from stability and love, to place her in a "foreign" country and fragmented family.

Instead of resolving the differences amongst themselves, and get their own situation together, they instead focus on people who stepped in to do the right thing......which, obviously, these people still refuse to learn what that means exactly.

So what we're left with is placing the option before the child, who sees her new mother doing the best she can, and undoubtably knows it will break her heart to say so what she may really feel.

Wait until she gets older.




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[*] posted on 12.19.2008 at 08:16 PM


http://img360.imageshack.us/img360/2112/eminemwi0109lgsv2.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFxfoM3b6jQ

Eminem still lives and records in Detroit, Michigan. The title of his movie 8 Mile refers to the road that divides the city's poor and rich neighborhoods. He recently published an autobiographical book, The Way I Am.


Don't call it a comeback.


People can try to reinvent themselves. I don't think you can really change who you are, though, because who you are is pretty much where you came from and what you've done up to now. You can change your image and all that -- you can change your [Censored] clothes, your underwear,your hair color, all that [Censored] -- but it's not going to mean you're a brand-new person.

You want to say, "I don't give a f*ck what anybody says." Yeah, you do.

I'm sure people think I've vanished off the face of the earth.

I went for nine, ten years straight, without taking a break at all. I needed to rejuvenate.

I'm a T-shirt guy now. But wifebeaters won't go out of style, not as long as b*tches keep mouthing off.

I like it when people talk [Censored]. Because if people weren't talking [Censored], there would be nothing for me to come back with. I need that. If I don't have any ammo, what am I going to say?

There's obviously a limit to the things you want people to know, but I've pretty much put most of it out there. Maybe people don't know what kind of underwear I wear, what color.

Boxers. Pink.

It's fun to take a step back and hear other people do it, say [Censored] I wish I would have thought of. I'm still a fan of rap.

When people buy a CD, you don't get to sit in the car with them and watch their faces and watch their jaws drop.

The guy behind the counter notices me, but I haven't put an album out in four years. "How you doing Marshall?" "What's up Em?" You pay for the gas, buy a bag of chips, and leave. But I put a record out, and that same person is going to be behind the counter with a camera and a piece of paper. "Can you sign this?"
It's not like I'm going to be a prick to everybody I meet. I keep it cool.

You're not going to say anything about me that I'm not going to say about myself. There's so many things that I think about myself; if someone really wanted to get at me, they could say this and this and this. So I'm going to say it before they can. It's the best policy for me.
Trust is hard to come by. That's why my circle is small and tight. I'm kind of funny about making new friends.
I don't know where to go to meet a nice girl. If you've got any tips, clue me in.

The emotions in a song -- the anger, aggression -- have got to be legitimate.

When I'm in the studio with Dre, I don't have to worry about the beat. I can just go. That's the only thing I got to concentrate on. When I'm trying to produce a song myself, I'm thinking about the high hat. Is it loud enough? The snare drum. Is it clear enough? This piano in the chorus. Is it too loud? That can be time-consuming.

Within the last year, I started learning how to not be so angry about things, learning how to count my [Censored] blessings instead. By doing that, I've become a happier person, instead of all this self-loathing I was doing for a while.

The music, I wouldn't say it's gotten happier, but it's definitely more upbeat. I feel like myself again.

Don't get me wrong, the aggression will still be there.
I don't know if I've fully accepted Proof's death, but I think I've come to terms with it a little bit, knowing how to cope. There was a good two years that I was pretty down in the [Censored] dumps. I just lay in bed and stared at the [Censored] ceiling. One day, I didn't get up until 7:30 that night.

Not that I don't guide them at all, because sometimes I do, right from wrong. Hailie's twelve now, and she still thinks it's really bad to stick up your middle finger. I think I'm doing pretty good, with what my music is about and being able to raise little girls at the same time.

I would say I'm an excellent dad, not to toot my own horn. Toot.

If you don't overlook the fact of what you look like, then no one else will. I had a complex back then: If I get booed off stage, it's probably because I'm white. There comes a time when you gotta stop thinking like that and just be you.

I want to say I'd be a comic-book artist. That was my dream as a kid. I used to paint and draw. If I wouldn't have had rap, I would have strived to -- the past tense of strive, is it stroved? -- I would have stroven to do something like that. Who knows? Maybe I would have.

Nobody likes to fail. I want to succeed in everything I do, which isn't much. But the things that I'm really passionate about, if I fail at those, if I'm not successful, what do I have?

Sh*t happens. F*cking happens to the best of us. Really does.:thanx:




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