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Author: Subject: May Theme
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butterfly.gif posted on 4.20.2005 at 12:09 PM
May Theme


First off, I would like to apologize for not being involved in April's book . . . I couldn't find it at the library and at the time, I had no money to go and purchase the book :sorry: But I will be involved in this one . . .

I still would like to do an international theme if possible, but if anyone has any suggestions please bring them forward :thanx:




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[*] posted on 4.20.2005 at 01:08 PM



Yes, V, I was in the same position as you....:nod:
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[*] posted on 4.20.2005 at 01:48 PM



Quote:
Originally posted by PecanDelite
Yes, V, I was in the same position as you....:nod:


Me 3 and I really like the Kindred. I use to own it, but let someone borrow it and never got it back. I checked 4 different libraries and they didnt have it.




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[*] posted on 4.22.2005 at 12:20 PM



Okay, so does anyone have any suggestions for a theme during May?



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[*] posted on 4.25.2005 at 09:51 AM



Okay, I'm about to pick 5 books if no one comes in here by tomorrow morning! :lol:



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[*] posted on 4.25.2005 at 10:48 AM



OK, Mothers Day is in May. Lets read something about mothers, but the only thing that comes to mind is Mommy Dearest, which I don’t want to read.
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[*] posted on 4.25.2005 at 10:58 AM



:lol:
I like that idea though . . . I think I can find 5 books about mothers or where the mother is a main character.




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[*] posted on 4.25.2005 at 11:00 AM



Momma by Terry McMillian is the only Mother book I can think of.

Or White Oleander - that's a by a white author with white characters, but a very interesting read.

THeres even a movie with Michelle Pfier, Rnee Zwelleger and some other people.




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[*] posted on 4.25.2005 at 11:04 AM



It doesn't matter if the author is black or white.
I'm just looking for good books, cause the next few topics I'll be introducing will have selections from white authors.




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[*] posted on 4.25.2005 at 12:12 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by candy
Momma by Terry McMillian is the only Mother book I can think of.

Or White Oleander - that's a by a white author with white characters, but a very interesting read.

THeres even a movie with Michelle Pfier, Rnee Zwelleger and some other people.

That book was good, but too depressing. I don't think I could read it again




When other people make mistakes, we seek justice.
When we make mistakes, we seek compassion.
The lesson is to give to others what you seek.
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[*] posted on 4.25.2005 at 12:17 PM



I will try to find some books about mothers, if anyone has any suggestions please let me know!

Within the next few hours, I will have a polling thread started with selections that I've found. I will try to stick to black mothers, but if I see anything interesting, I will post it also.
:thanx:




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[*] posted on 4.26.2005 at 12:38 PM


Quote:
Originally posted by candy
Momma by Terry McMillian is the only Mother book I can think of.


For Terry fans there's also another book by Terry Mcmillan written about a mother and her family:

A DAY LATE AND A DOLLAR SHORT
by Terry McMillan
add to cart | U.S. $14.00


INTRODUCTION


"One thing I do know about men and kids is that they always come back. They may be a day late and a dollar short, but they always come back." –Viola, A Day Late and A Dollar Short

When Viola Price returns home from the hospital after a near fatal asthma attack, she comes to an important realization: she may not survive the next one. While keeping her fears a secret from everyone but her best friend, Loretta, Viola shapes a plan for bringing her family—on the verge of breaking apart from numerous petty squabbles and insecurities—together as a supportive, loving unit. Doing so will prove no easy task but one that Viola, who asserts "it's my job to meddle," is more than equipped to tackle. Over the course of the next few months, Viola records her observations and advice to each of them. Meanwhile, Cecil and her four children struggle with the various roles as parents, children, and individuals. Terry McMillan lets each Price speak out in his or her own voice and, in so doing, opens a window onto their respective strengths and weaknesses, hopes and fears.

Lewis, the only son, carries what is, perhaps, the heaviest burden. Sexually abused as a child and suffering from the early onset of arthritis, Lewis—when he's not in jail—seeks solace in the bottle and the easy affections of women. "Sometimes I wish I'da been born white," he laments. "Things probably would'a been a helluva lot easier." But his alcohol-ravaged health, the needs of his son, Jamil, and Viola's illness are on a collision course that he'll need more than crossword puzzle skills and a martyr's attitude to survive.

As the youngest child, Janelle is not accustomed to figuring things out on her own. "She always being led out to some pasture and don't know how she got there," complains Viola. And so, when she stumbles upon her daughter, Shanice, being sexually molested by her second husband, George, she reacts the only way she knows how, "I should kill him. But I don't move." More engaged with her elaborate holiday decorations than her family, Janelle is shocked into virtual paralysis, unable to respond to the situation. She is then confronted by the realization that she must do the one thing she has always found a way to avoid: act on her own, without a man's guidance.

Second-born Charlotte's geographical distance from the rest of the Prices is metaphorical for the wide moat of hostility that separates her from them. She even refuses—can't and won't are identical concepts in Charlotte's logic—to visit when Viola is first hospitalized. The deep and abiding anger that prevents Charlotte from seeing Viola also threatens to permanently alienate her from her siblings and destroy her marriage to her loving husband, Al. She's proud of the fact that she has no confidantes: "I only tell people what I want them to know," she boasts but, like her house, Charlotte might "look good on the outside, but on the inside, its falling apart."

Paris is the quintessential eldest child and a source of both pride and envy within the Price family. She has worked hard for her nice home, doting son, and thriving career but, while her comfortable financial position allows her to help Viola, it draws her less affluent siblings' resentment. And her "I believe when you make a promise, you should keep it" philosophy neither offers nor invites empathy for human weakness. Yet, Paris' own weaknesses grow exponentially with her responsibilities and success. Her increasing dependence on painkillers exaggerates her carefully cultivated emotional detachment—and both are about to disrupt her facade of control.

Alternating and juxtaposing their stories, McMillan weaves together the delicate threads of family that are constantly strained by sibling rivalry and everyday strife but, fortified by Viola, are strong enough to endure the weight of sexual abuse and substance addiction.

Lewis, Janelle, Charlotte, and Paris all have very definite opinions about their siblings but few of them are positive. It is through Viola that they discover a place where they can release the past and see one another and themselves afresh. Viola also helps her beloved but estranged husband, Cecil, become both the father that her children are going to need and a man willing to shoulder the coming responsibilities of his new family. Viola knows one thing about men and kids, "they always come back." And, certainly Cecil and the Price children do unite, at last, but largely through their shared love and respect for the indomitable, unforgettable Viola.

As Paris ultimately realizes the incalculable and priceless value of Viola's love, she reflects, "our history, our lives together as a family, and after looking at our mother and father, I think we . . . realize where we came from and who we are."




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[*] posted on 4.26.2005 at 12:39 PM



I'm putting up the poll right now, but I will include this one as a 6th option :nod:



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[*] posted on 4.26.2005 at 12:44 PM



Quote:
Originally posted by msclassychic
Quote:
Originally posted by candy
Momma by Terry McMillian is the only Mother book I can think of.


For Terry fans there's also another book by Terry Mcmillan written about a mother and her family:

A DAY LATE AND A DOLLAR SHORT
by Terry McMillan
add to cart | U.S. $14.00


INTRODUCTION


"One thing I do know about men and kids is that they always come back. They may be a day late and a dollar short, but they always come back." –Viola, A Day Late and A Dollar Short

When Viola Price returns home from the hospital after a near fatal asthma attack, she comes to an important realization: she may not survive the next one. While keeping her fears a secret from everyone but her best friend, Loretta, Viola shapes a plan for bringing her family—on the verge of breaking apart from numerous petty squabbles and insecurities—together as a supportive, loving unit. Doing so will prove no easy task but one that Viola, who asserts "it's my job to meddle," is more than equipped to tackle. Over the course of the next few months, Viola records her observations and advice to each of them. Meanwhile, Cecil and her four children struggle with the various roles as parents, children, and individuals. Terry McMillan lets each Price speak out in his or her own voice and, in so doing, opens a window onto their respective strengths and weaknesses, hopes and fears.

Lewis, the only son, carries what is, perhaps, the heaviest burden. Sexually abused as a child and suffering from the early onset of arthritis, Lewis—when he's not in jail—seeks solace in the bottle and the easy affections of women. "Sometimes I wish I'da been born white," he laments. "Things probably would'a been a helluva lot easier." But his alcohol-ravaged health, the needs of his son, Jamil, and Viola's illness are on a collision course that he'll need more than crossword puzzle skills and a martyr's attitude to survive.

As the youngest child, Janelle is not accustomed to figuring things out on her own. "She always being led out to some pasture and don't know how she got there," complains Viola. And so, when she stumbles upon her daughter, Shanice, being sexually molested by her second husband, George, she reacts the only way she knows how, "I should kill him. But I don't move." More engaged with her elaborate holiday decorations than her family, Janelle is shocked into virtual paralysis, unable to respond to the situation. She is then confronted by the realization that she must do the one thing she has always found a way to avoid: act on her own, without a man's guidance.

Second-born Charlotte's geographical distance from the rest of the Prices is metaphorical for the wide moat of hostility that separates her from them. She even refuses—can't and won't are identical concepts in Charlotte's logic—to visit when Viola is first hospitalized. The deep and abiding anger that prevents Charlotte from seeing Viola also threatens to permanently alienate her from her siblings and destroy her marriage to her loving husband, Al. She's proud of the fact that she has no confidantes: "I only tell people what I want them to know," she boasts but, like her house, Charlotte might "look good on the outside, but on the inside, its falling apart."

Paris is the quintessential eldest child and a source of both pride and envy within the Price family. She has worked hard for her nice home, doting son, and thriving career but, while her comfortable financial position allows her to help Viola, it draws her less affluent siblings' resentment. And her "I believe when you make a promise, you should keep it" philosophy neither offers nor invites empathy for human weakness. Yet, Paris' own weaknesses grow exponentially with her responsibilities and success. Her increasing dependence on painkillers exaggerates her carefully cultivated emotional detachment—and both are about to disrupt her facade of control.

Alternating and juxtaposing their stories, McMillan weaves together the delicate threads of family that are constantly strained by sibling rivalry and everyday strife but, fortified by Viola, are strong enough to endure the weight of sexual abuse and substance addiction.

Lewis, Janelle, Charlotte, and Paris all have very definite opinions about their siblings but few of them are positive. It is through Viola that they discover a place where they can release the past and see one another and themselves afresh. Viola also helps her beloved but estranged husband, Cecil, become both the father that her children are going to need and a man willing to shoulder the coming responsibilities of his new family. Viola knows one thing about men and kids, "they always come back." And, certainly Cecil and the Price children do unite, at last, but largely through their shared love and respect for the indomitable, unforgettable Viola.

As Paris ultimately realizes the incalculable and priceless value of Viola's love, she reflects, "our history, our lives together as a family, and after looking at our mother and father, I think we . . . realize where we came from and who we are."


oh yeah, forgot about that one. But girrrrrrrrrrrl that book had me boo hooing like my momma died. Good read though




I thought what I wanted was something I needed, when momma said NO, I just should have heeded.
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